Sunday, September 29, 2019

Crossroads

Move fast but try not to move faster than the speed of thought, especially if you are approaching a crossroads. Semantically, crossroads is a word than hides its singularity under the guise of plurality. A crossroads is, in fact, the intersection of two or more roads that also signifies a crucial decision point.

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Plastics Everywhere

Dustin Hoffman’s breakout film role as Benjamin Braddock in the 1967 movie The Graduate featured a young man fresh out of college. During a tête-à-tête with a family friend, Mr. Mcguire, Benjamin received a one-word career advice: “Plastics.” For emphasis, Mcguire repeated, There's a great future in plastics. Think about it. Will you think about it?

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Hand-Me-Down

Nostalgia is a double-edged device that can flood the mind with positive memories, but sometimes could be tinged with regret. Recently, I came across a newspaper article titled “The Appliances That Just Go On And On.” The story featured reminiscences by respondents waxing lyrical about their time-defying domestic gadgets, several of which hatraversed two generations, and others waxing indignant about more modern acquisitions.

Sunday, September 8, 2019

Reform, Not

There are buzzwords and then there are mega buzzwords. In business, when nudged into making an elevator pitch, white-collar executives might rehash their corporate strategy. In the public sector, politicians and policymakers, with very little prompting, tend to bang on about reform. Doubtless, strategy and reform are credible word cloud favourites in a media age clogged with widgets that spew out useful metadata and superfluous statistics, more of the latter.

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Waterloo

From the perspective of a non-American, who has absolutely no skin in the game, I still experience mental whiplash whenever I hear an American politician offer “thoughts and prayers” after a mass shooting in the country. However, following the recent spate of mindless mayhem, I did a double-take when a hyper-partisan National Rifle Association-affiliated talking head uttered the phrase “I feel your pain” on television. Involuntarily, I sputtered, “No, you don’t.”

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